Skip to main content

About your Search

20120925
20121003
STATION
CSPAN 4
KQED (PBS) 4
CSPAN2 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 2
WRC (NBC) 2
CNBC 1
CNN 1
CNNW 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KICU 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
KSTS (Telemundo) 1
WETA 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 30
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
nyguen is one of those students he has a bachelors in computer science and you would think in silicon valley that would all but guarantee you a job. minh nyguen sjsu graduate:"so now i'm back at it looking for a job again looking for anything web related. web testing or anything." despite nyguen's difficulty finding a job ... the unemployment rate is dropping. according to the california employment development department the jobless rate went down from 8.8 percent in july to 8.5 percent in august in the south bay. last year the average was 9.7 percent. susan rockwell is assistant director for employment services at the san jose state career center. susan rockwell assistant director for employment services at the career center "i think it is easier than it was a year ago because the job market has improved then what it was a year ago. i also think that it depends on how much time a student invests in it. so if you're really invested and you're putting your full time efforts into finding a position you're probably gonna find one faster than someone who is spending a little bit of time."
, and other research is a tuition for developing the next-generation of sciences in the biomedical spear and for generating new ideas in the bio tech industry and several others depend on. despite all of these good things, there has been little change in the budgets since the 5-year doubling of the budget. when the count in inflation, we are back in buying power. with the rapid growth of the medical community and increased expense of bioscience work, the success rate for grant applicants has fallen to an all- time low to about 14% of nci and 17% nih wide. that is an ironic comment at the time when the scientific opportunities are remarkably high in part because many prior investments -- and the result of deciphering the blueprint of living organisms through the human genome project. they analyze the chromosomes of many microorganisms. the ability to support and enlarging and scientific community, the by medical ecosystem is under unusual stress. there is more investment elsewhere in other countries and more stable environment for research. we are running the risk of losing leadership to
we are looking at science fiction becoming tomorrows reality 1:16 -- hoy estamos viendo que lo que antes parecia ciencia ficcion pronto se convertira en realidad... -- y anque aun falta para que se vean en las autopistas.. ya se esta planteando las pregunta de que pasaria si estos no respetan el semaforo en rojo.. sot: 1:27 "do not run red lights" -- google respondio a esto.. que sus carros no se pasan la luz roja ... pero antes que le den luz verde a ellos.. la legislacion requiere que el departamento de vehiculos motorizados redacte las regulaciones antes de enero de 2015... outro --aunque el vehiculo se maneja solo.. necesitara que una persona con licencia este detras del volante para responder en caso de emergencia... blanca ---primera pausa pero al volver, take vo ---faltan solo 5 dias para que se decida el futuro de varios proyectos de ley en favor de los inmigrantes cesar ---el consulado de mexico en san francisco lucha contra la violencia que afecta a muchas familias en nuestra region.. segment ends cesar ---faltan tan solo cinco dias para que el gobernador jerry brown, tak
the best possible science, and they have shown that it's possible to improve care and by improving care, reduce the overall cost of care. james: we deliver about 34,000 children a year. it turns out we have the ability to start labor artificially. it's called elective induction. now, sometimes you have to get that baby delivered because the mom's health or the baby health will be affected. an elective induction is purely for convenience. the direct consequence of inappropriate elective induction is cesarean section deliveries. we've seen huge differences in rates of cesarean section across the country, and the evidence is increasingly clear that the higher rates are not necessarily good for patients. the national c-section rate today is running about 34%. intermountain as a system is running at about 20%. some hospitals in this country have c-section rates as high as 45%. feinberg: our rates of c-section in santa monica are high. we really want to do not one more c-section than necessary, but in all of these improvements, it's changing behaviors of patients, it's changing behaviors of p
years of english, three years of science, math, and social science, compared to those who didn't complete a core curriculum, those who completed the core curriculum scored 144 points higher than those who did not. when we look at those who took honors courses, they scored nearly 300 points above those who did not take honors or ap courses. rigor of the academic course load in high school leads to do better on the s.a.t. and leads students to being better prepared for college. let me give you this information in terms of framing the challenge of our country faces. for every 100 ninth graders, only 70 will graduate from high school. 44 local want to college. only 30 students will enroll in the second year of college. only 21 will graduate from a four-year institution in a six- year period of time. that is not good enough to keep the united states competitive in a global economy. we are very much focused on having high expectations for all students and doing what we can to better prepare students for college success and keep those high expectations for all students coming from all
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ male announcer ] introducing a reason to look twice. the entirely new lexus es and the first-ever es hybrid. this is the pursuit of perfection. >>> welcome back. with 30 seconds on the clock, our next guest will tell us what else they think will move the markets tomorrow. . ward, let's kick it off with you. what do you want to look at tomorrow when the opening bell sounds? >> i think the growth rate will be similar to the second estimate. some compositional changes will portend for slower growth and will grow 1% to 1.5% in q3 and q4 paving the way for the fed to convert operation twist into a q.e. with purchases of 30-year treasury bonds. >> we'll watch that. dan, you're up for tomorrow's trading session? >> maria, the market's going to look at a couple of things. initial claims, durable goods, gdp as ward said. if they show weakness, the market could struggle a little more. but we look for companies with strong earnings, capability to grow and a so
science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: israel's prime minister warned again today that iran is well on its way to creating a nuclear weapon and said the world needs to act. benjamin netanyahu spoke at the united nations. as he has often before, netanyahu condemned iran and its nuclear program, and called on other leaders to do the same. >> at stake is not merely the future of my country. at stake is the future of the world. and nothing could imperil our common future more than the arming of iran with nuclear weapons. >> woodruff: the israeli prime minister said the hour is, quote, "getting late" to stop iran as it continues its nuclear work. >> i speak about it now because the iranian nuclear calendar doesn't take time out for anyone or for anything. i speak aut it now because when it com
discovery with water possibly present on the planet mars. >> the consensus opinion of the science team is that this is a rock with water. it can be characterized as being vigorous flow. on the surface of mars. >> scientists say that there is likely a stream bed at one point. it has flowed down. >> this live look outside. pretty clear. however, those fog conditions along the area? >> yes. with visibility at weather judg sunshine will not be quite as widespread. as for goal for tomorrow that heat is back on. as we go for tomorrow. and what is ahead? temperatures are going to be unseasonably warm. in fact, this is the warm says the month of chewed.and we will have detailsf that coming up since the month of-june. --built with the visibility only 2 mi. at half moon bay and in hayward. it is going to stick around for the next several hours. and it is also a chilly start. 40's and daly city, novato and here is a look at where we could expect for those temperatures for this afternoon. they've to yesterday with mountain view, 70's. campbell, san jose. if you're going to the case came tonight? t
-driving cars, yes, i said self-driving cars, governor jerry brown called the vehicles "science fiction becoming tomorrow's reality." >> they're closer to being reality than you might think. in fact, abc's jim avila h already taken one out for a test drive. >> reporter: you have seen this -- cars that slam on the brakes before you hit a pole. but here's something you have never seen. the car of the future making the driver totally unnecessary. no hand. google is working on one. and the federal government is sponsoring a field test in ann arbor, michigan with cars that automatically swerve past potential accidents and alert you to oncoming hazards. and now this at general motors' test track, i sat in the driver's seat as this cadillac at high speeds stayed in its lane. at 60 miles an hour it stopped on its own even when a car driving 30 miles slower pulleden front of us. >> we can foresee the day when vehicles will avoid collisions. >> reporter: it has been a car maker's dream since george jetson sat in his automated flying car. >> the vehicle can take complete control and take you to your destin
you moving. ♪ feeling free. ♪ >>> sunday morning on "biocentury this week." science and the age of austerity. what will deep budget cults mean for n.i.h.? -- cuts mean for n.i.h.? watch "biocentury this week" ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ahh, i've been crawling around this desert all day. it's hot, my throat is dry. i need water! water! oh, thanks. let's go check out some more animals. we're here in the colorado desert with my friend liz, who's the animal curator at the living desert zoo and botanical gardens. and we've come across a really interesting and an easy animal to really approach in the desert, because they don't move very fast. and, liz, this is a california desert tortoise, right? liz: right. jarod: now, this particular desert tortoise, this is probably one of the most ultimately adapted animals of all. i mean, they've been around for millions of years. turtles and tortoises are -- i mean, there are so many adaptations, but this particular specie of desert tortoise has really adapted to kind of take it to the next level and really handle some extreme conditions. liz: yes. jar
of state for political affairs. political science professor at norfolk state university will focus on the role of virginia in the election and a history of the african-american vote in virginia. we will also be joined by editor in chief of the washington monthly to discuss recent articles in the magazine examining the consumer financial protection bureau. live on c-span every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> i watched c-span every time, especially when i really pay attention the most. any time something is going on i want to watch c-span because they typically have the best, most unbiased view of whatever is happening. if i want to get spun in a circle of watch one of the other news organizations. i love c-span. watch on tv, on line. if something's going on now want to know what's happening al west and to c-span. don't know that i have a favorite show. for me it is always just anytime i need to know what's going on i know that c-span will have the real story of what's been happening. >> jeff trick watch is c-span on direct tv, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to yo
right by medical science, is really critical for achieving health and preventing these diseases. so the green new deal is a win/win win because it gets us to clean energy which can stop the climate crisis, jump start our economy, creating three times as many jobs as every dollar spent in the fossil fuel economy, and it puts us back to work. so it's a win/win win all around. host: dawn, joining us from oxford, alabama with dr. jill stein, last call. good morning to you. caller: good morning. i kind of agree with an awful lot of what you said about the cause of all this. but the one thing that you admitted and i'm cureuse about, what would -- kaoeurous about, what would make a banker with the subprime mortgage, what would make him -- which the whole goal is to make money, as much as he can, what would make a banker loan money to somebody that he knows was not going to be able to pay him back? and then do they just think -- get a meeting and say we're going to create these instances where we're going to loan money for people to buyouts, paopl that can't pay it back and sell it to someb
's surface. below book represents the science team is that this is a rock that was formed in the presence of water. we can characterize that with a vigorous flow of the surface of mars. >> scientists say that the stones are too large with out the presence of water. and their belief that there could be a water flow. >> we are looking at a much slower than usual drive. what would be considered the non-commute direction. and what might have otherwise been only 20 minutes is still 51 minutes. northbound through the san ramon valley. again, this is northbound from the san ramon, a dublin towards walnut creek. there have been too different accidents the north the first and worst is here if rockier road. and it has been nearly one hour. and both of these are clear we are left with this residuals life. a quick check of the bridges. that late accident at the base of the inclined. that backed up traffic all the way to the mes. however, he conceived of backup into this and toug this was not a hot spot as it has been for several days. with conditions of light and easy and at the golden gate you work
proposals. i'm asking -- >> 100,000 new math and science teachers. we need that. >> that's a goal, right? >> educating training 2 million new workers in our community colleges in conjunction with business to fill jobs that are open right now. boosting american manufacturing by ending the tax break that sends jobs overseas and giving tax incentives to companies that start manufacturing businesses here. these are specific tangible proposals and i believe they will pass because i believe the american people are supportive of that. >> but they haven't passed. >> the verdict will be rendered november 6. megyn: joining me now mark hannah, former aid to john kerry and barack obama. kevin, your chots on that exchange? >> that was a revealing look inside the best talking points that president obama has by his top spokesperson on the campaign frame beside himself. if you can't get more prekay tough than education, green energy, research and development, and that's the solutions? those are the pin points for solutions you are offering for an election that's going to be decided on an economy and job
is in sarasota high school. her science class was supposed to be for 24 students. she's the 36th student in that classroom. they sent me a picture of her in the classroom. they can't squeeze another desk in for her, so she has to stand during class. i want the federal government, consistent with local control and new accountability, to make improvement of our schools the number one priority so caley will have a desk and can sit down in a classroom where she can learn. >> all right. so having heard the two of you, the voters have just heard the two of you, what is the difference? what is the choice between the two of you on education? >> the first is, the difference is there is no new accountability measures in vice president gore's plan. he says he's for voluntary testing. you can't have voluntary testing. you must have mandatory testing. you must say that if you receive money you must show us whether or not children are learning to read and write and add and subtract. that's the difference. you may claim you've got mandatory testing but you don't, mr. vice president. that's a huge diffe
moderator. jenna: like him on that. gregg: let's recruit him. sounds like something out of science fiction but scientists say they developed medical devices that dissolve safely inside the body. we'll have that story coming up or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-term payout into a lump sum of cash today. jenna: some very interesting medical news for you. scientists say they have developed medical devices that do the work they're designed for on side your body and then, just dissolve. what happens to them? that is the question we have for dr. ernest patty, senior attending physician at st. barna bass hospital in the bronx. doctor, what are we talking about here? medical devices that dissolve, come on. >> small electronic devices. call them transient electronics made out of silicon and magnesium. they're covered in a silk cocoon. they use the silk because the silk is absorbed by the body as well as silicon and magnesium. jenna: what is scenario where someone may have a medical device you're describing? >> th
the most government funded research fop push out the boundary of science and technology our best innovators and entrepreneurs can pluck them and start the new company. it you think about that as the formula for success an education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high schools drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming to high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to american society of civil engineers we're $2 trillion in deficit in terms of infrastructure. immigration, we have a policy now that basically says here come here get a great education and get the hell of our country. we are fighting on the simplest h1b issues that are vital phenomena the future strength. fourth the rules for incentive risk taking and recklessness. i don't think we have em i didded to the degree we want. on government funded research if you see in the gap it looks like ekg heading for heart attack. i don't know relative to what all i know in terms of the things that historically made us great, on each one of those, i see us not going in the direction we shou
nomg or science that we stable an h1b visa to them so they can stay in this country and help grow jobs here. he has always made keeping families together part of his comprehensive immigration reform. >> but he has never said that he would let these visas stand that the president just granted. >> no, no, no. what you just said to me was he said he was going to have it taken care of. meaning that he has said that among his top priorities would be working with congress, enacting a comprehensive immigration reform. of which keeping families together would be part ofhat program. so i think it's totally consistent with what he said, because it's a top priority of his to get done. and unlike this president, he would get it done in the first two years of his administration. >> it may be consistent but you do agree what he told the denver post last night is new. it is new news as we say in the news business. he's never said that before. >> well, you may be saying he never used those same words in the same sentence before. but if you go ahead and look at mitt romney dotcom where he laid out his
the subjectivity out of it and you put science around it. so it gives you a benchmark for the products that you have. so when we start looking at that, what we did was we said okay, what are some other alternatives? how can we horne into this as -- honey into this -- hone into this aspect of this particular product. we looked at things from the food industry, for instance. when we did that we came up with the clean stem fluid which is sourced as you said entirely from the fluid industry. what that did by developing those right off the bat, we had two or three orders magnitude stepdown in the numbers. >> numbers of what? >> it's a relative ranking. if you look at one product just in round numbers, let's say it's got an 800, which is what we have been using, some are down to 300 this. >> in terms of what? >> the effects of health, safety and environmental standpoint. >> researching and developing the new recipes for fracking is very expensive. tens of millions of dollars i imagine. >> yes, sir. >> the company believes the existing process, the ones they have been using for years is safe. why is h
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)